Stoner Jo (Jo Riou) FR



Stoner Jo (Jo Riou) FR
 

Once again, there's a kind of french touch flavour today and the site, but be sure this is not the only reason why Jo is here for us. Definitly not, his perfect music taste, his love for beer aare certainly what made me wonder to have him onboard, together, maybe ( ;) ) with his huge talent and the pleasure it has been to do this interview !





Hello,

Hello and thanks for this interview

Of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?

Music is my dope so it's very rare if you listen nothing at my home... In this case i'm probably dead. I listening all kind of music but probably 80% of my sound is Stoner/psyche rock!

Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do? 

I'm French, 31 years old, living near from Paris. I'm an independant graphic designer since almost 2 years, and I make especialy posters for the Stoner scene in France, and when I could around the globe. Before that I was webdesigner in a shitty start-up during 5 years.

When did you start drawing?

As far I can remember, I begin very young. As a lot of people. Around 8/10 years I began to create my own stuffs and make some copies of Japan anime or French/Belgian comics. It's only around 12/14 I'd discovered American comics and began to take some Art courses at college.

Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

The both ! I take a specialised cursus in High School to learn « Arts Plastiques », and generally all the margins of my schoolbooks get a messy graphic aspect also sometimes that gone outside of the margins, a lot of tables had suffering because of me. After that I was make 3 years in specialization from Visual Communication / Multimedia création, and go to work as a Webdesigner.

Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

That's the plan. But it's not so easy. Currently this is only a few months that my activity becomes really consistent and allows me to consider the best for the future. Outside the posters I realized some album artworks, I have a lot of demands for various merchandising, and I have a lot of concert organizations projects, tour bands and exhibitions for occupy my time and try to make little money. Actually it's common for me to do odd jobs to complete my bills at the ends of month.

Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

My collaborations stop at the music scene. I am part of an association: "ARE YOU STONED INC", with whom we set up gigs in South-east of France, Thing I also do independently to help bands from my buddies or just by passion. For graphic stuffs I'm setting up an exhibition called « Stoned Eyes for Rock Ears » around graphics and Stoner Rock which I will invite many of my comrades!


Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

Mainly my influences come from american comic books, Art Nouveau, Russian propaganda posters, old inked engravings and of course all the psychedelic posters arts of the East Coast of the United States during the 70's and also all the artists from the Golden Age of Heavy Metal (the magazine). But anything can be inspirational, a photo, a book, some street-art, an idea, a dream, the music, an item... No bundaries to the imagination, it's very important to not be boring for a creative activity like ours.
But it's clear i've got a big list of inspirational artists very various but I can quote : Mucha, Moebius, Shepard Pharey, Hayao Miyasaki, Mike Mignola, Jack Kirby, Hokusai, Gustave Doré... And many of the actual graphic posters designer, but I could continue this list for days and days... So next question.

Do you do everything by hand or on computer? 

Actually the both. All the basics of my drawings are done by hand. First I realize several sketches, I chose one, I work the positioning of my various elements. Generally this phase there is either very detailed or it's just me who knows what it is. Then I ink in accordance with pens or chinese ink. And any final dispositions and colors are made by computer, using Photoshop and Illustrator. But for me it's impossible to do something without the handmade phases even the photomontages I realize throught by the sketch part!

How long does it take you to do a poster?

It depends on the level of details I put into a creation. But that does not exceed 15H generally spread over 2 days.

You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it ?

I think I politely explain to the person who made me this request he didn't see my work for asked me such a request. I don't think I've a defined style but I love variety in my references and in my work, but that kind of request it's not for me. My rule is that : if you ask someone to do something for you, you need to know the style and the work of the person, it's like a tattoo. You're not going to ask someone specializes in black and white portraits for you to make an abstract colored one ...

Ahah
For which band have you already worked for?

I am fortunate to be in Europe or stoner scene is in full development like in France, Spain, Greece and Italy and where many bands and projects are taking place. So that's the biggest part of my job. So I have the chance to work with talented and various bands like PLANET OF ZEUS, DOMADORA, 1000MODS, DOT LEGACY, LIBIDO FUZZ, MOTHER SLOTH, the music label THE SMOKING GOAT, WOODWALL, and many others with whom it's a pleasure to work.
For bigger bands I have the other chance to participate in full of festivals and gigs, thanks to Are You Stoned Inc. that its own festival BLIZZARD'S MOUNTAIN FEST and JENS HEIDE and FREAK VALLEY FESTIVAL, and Obviously the STONED GATHERINGS gigs in Paris where I began 2 years ago. Thanks to all of them, who opened me a lot of doors and full of possibilities. With them and thanks to them I could work for : KADAVAR, RADIO MOSCOW, SAMSARA BLUES EXPERIMENT, MONKEY 3, THE FLYING EYES, NAAM, ENOS, MIDNIGHT GHOST TRAIN, NIGHTSTALKERS, ALUNAH, VIDUNDER and much more...

For which band would you love to work?

I dream to work for band like Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, The Who, Ten Years After, Deep Purple, The Animals... and so many others, but it seems it's too late... No seriously it's not possible to make an exhaustive list, they're too many...

Do you choose the artists yourself?

Yeah I just realize I've got this chance too ! By thinking even the posters for venues or festivals I have the choice of the bands I could do! The rest of time it's me who contact the bands with whom I want to work. Or bands contact me and I chose if Yes or Not i want to do their projects.

What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ? 

Clearly find the idea who correspond to what expect the band, or their universe and something you can create... When this is ok, no problem at all... If not I don't do this Job haha !



Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

From the start I think the fact to making rock posters place you in a type of « scene ». Maybe the proof I do part of something like that is your interview today Ahahah! But it's not an official stuff for me. I'm very close of my friend Antoine from Headbang Design with whom I share lot of friendship and projects. I get along with other artists also working on the same music scene than me in France like Arrache toi un Oeil, Will Argunas, Alexis Dr Big Al, Seb Bismuth... And that's cool. Maybe the exhibition project I've got will be the occasion to officialised something about that, we'll see !

A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life? 

You can follow regulary my work and stuffs on my facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/Jo.Riou.Graphics and to see only my works without all the crap of facebook hive got my page here : http://jonathan-riou.tumblr.com/ . I should soon put in place a more comprehensive site where people can buy my posters, but also T-shirts, patches and I hope many other things.
2015 will be a big year for me and you could met me in a lot of places : April at the DESERTFEST BERLIN, I hope in May at my Exhibition in south of Paris, June at Siegen for the FREAK VALLEY FESTIVAL, in July at « Le petit VAR WEST Festival », August in Greece at the « FUZZTASTIC PLANET FESTIVAL » and I hope so many other places !!!

The best praise you received lately?

Recently My Sleeping Karma that asks me to take a poster I made for them and turn it into a T-shirt because their fans and them like it too much ! Also the leader of Monkey 3 who wrote me to say he really loved my poster I made for them to the Freak Valley Festival. And again thanks to The Freak Valley who give me the possibility to make a poster for a 1969 band's and legend of Krautrock in Germany aka BRÖSELMASCHINE and discovering a lot of people asked me to print the poster right now because they love it hahaha... If it could be like this every day Ahah!!!

What can we wish you for the future?
 
You could wish me 1) all my projects succeed 2) I get really live with my work 3)And it happens to me full of good things again! Anyway this is what I wish to you haha!

Thanks for answering my questions and see you soon on the website !!

Thanks and may the force be with you !



Headbang Design

After a long break, it's time for me to introduce new artists on the site and, because I am the one and only to decide who may or not appear here, I am pleased to welcome Antoine from Headbang Design to open this new season. With clients such as Pentagram, Sasquatch, The Sword, Lonely Kamel, Blues Pills or Truckfighters, this frenchy proves art has no boundaries...

  Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?


I’m listening to something like 7 to 9 hours of music each working day, so I’m always in search of something new.
I have a deezer account with hundreds of favorite artists, and my office is overloaded with CDs and LPs…
The core is stoner and doom music – any cool band I can find, from Kyuss to Electric Wizard, Om, Clutch
and every other classic in these styles, to really underrated gems that no one knows. I’m also listening a bit of
classical music, pop artist such as Alt-J or even Phil Collins, all rock/blues legends
(Hendrix, Pink Floyd, Clapton, Bb. King…) there’s only too much to name, but if you come to visit me, chances are
You will hear a lot of guitar and drums, often stoner and doom music.
  

Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?



I’m a freelance illustrator from France. I’m freelancer since I started working six years ago. I’m also
a Photoshop teacher and writer for magazines (photography, graphic design).
Headbang Design, my “music illustration studio” is only a small part of my working activities.

When did you start drawing?

During childhood as most illustrators. I started watercolor a 8 and my first ‘good’ oil painting has been made a 12.

Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

I’ve been trained a bit in “courses” from 9 to 12 years old, there was a kind man showing us
how to improve our paintings… Then I studied graphic design for 3 years after high school,
just before moving to freelance. Then I became a drawing and Photoshop teacher in a French school, and I have
to admit that I learned a lot while trying to teach what I already knew! Some embarrassing questions or suggestions
from students helped me to move on and work harder on my drawings.


Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

I’m living from my array of graphic skills. That’s to say I’m not living 100% from drawings commissioned by musical
clients, but I also write articles for magazines, about drawing, Photoshop and graphic design, and I also work on
graphic designs for various clients – not only on drawings, but also logo, website, I also keep creating tutorials
for a DVD editor called Elephorm… So I’m living from my skills, call it “art” if you want.

Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

I wrote more than 120 articles for graphic design magazines such as Advanced Creation, Photoshop Mag, 3D mag…
But I don’t work much with musical fanzines.

Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?
What are the principal steps in your work ?

The only true direct influence that I have is Alphonse Mucha – I regularly get inspiration
and visual gimmicks from is work. I also look a lot to other illustrators’ work, but I never try to do the same thing.
I just try and get the mood and look I’m after, I can get some tricks from other illustrators, but in the end I only stick to
fundamentals – composition, colors, and maybe perspective if there’s any. The main steps are researching
(ideas and images for inspiration and/or drawing reference), sketching, final drawing and/or inking, then coloring.






Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

I mostly do everything on computer, with a Cintiq tablet – wich is a big 24’’ screen I’m directly drawing onto.
It feels really similar as a drawing table, but I use Photoshop instead of pen and paper.
It’s really close to traditional drawing, but with the additional magic of Photoshop. I love it.

How long does it take you to do a poster?

I’d love to say that I work 60 hours on a poster, but the fact is that it’s not the best job to get a good revenue,
so I try not to spend more than 10 hours on a poster. Most of the time the poster is done in something
between 5 to 7 hours. I know how to manage my time, so it all depends on budget.

You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it ?

No problem at all. I have a distinctive style for Headbang Design, and another style for my other commissions.
In fact I consider I have no style at all. The only thing I couldn’t create is a photo-real illustration, because I’m not
as good as I’d like to be.




For which band have you already worked for?

I work a lot for festivals and promoters, so I don’t have so many direct contacts with bands. I had the chance to chat
and get cool e-mail from bands such as Blues Pills, Sasquatch, Freedom Hawk, Mothership,
House Harkonnen, Wo Fat…
But not that much – I only started Headbang Design one year ago. The fact is that cool promoters and festivals
gave me the opportunity to create posters for many bands – Pentagram, The Sword, Orange Goblin, Karma to Burn,
Valley of the sun, Truckfighters, Kamchatka, Gas Giant, Lonely Kamel, Glowsun…mostly stoner bands, as it’s really my passion.  
The sad thing is that I don’t have much contacts with these bands, even if some are really kind and let me know
they loved the artwork – but most just don’t care about the posters ah ah.

For which band would you love to work?

I’d love to have some direct contact with The Sword, it’s a band that I love since many years.
I’d love to create anything for Clutch, Electric Wizard, Sleep. But I also love to create cool stuff for
bands I only discovered, small bands, unnoticed bands…it’s also a great pleasure.

Do you choose the artists yourself?

Absolutely. I contact a lot of bands that I love to get commissions from them. But some bands also contact me directly,
generally smaller bands just after I created something for a huge band. After I created the Pentagram poster
for one of their show in Dallas, TX, I had a lot of new clients from Texas who contacted me – remember
I’m living in Tours, a 160,000 people city in the center of France, so it’s unusual. 

What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ?

I don’t think there’s any hard part. For me poster creation is a refuge, like holidays, a great breath of fresh air
between two boring commissions for “regular clients”. The hardest thing over the years will be to have new ideas,
to try and avoid repetition, but at the moment this issue doesn’t exist. 






Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

No, I don’t think so. The only artist I feel close to is Jo Riou, a friend of mine who’s working with me
on Freak Valley and DesertFest festivals. We appreciate each other’s work, we hang out sometimes,
we share our booth to sell posters. We both are “stoner illustrators”, and there are others but
we don’t know them in person.

A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?

The best place to see my artwork on a regular basis is my facebook page. Http://www.facebook.com/headbangdesign
I also have a website for Headbang Design, but it’s just too boring to update, so I gave up trying for the moment.
If you want a chance to get signed posters, have a beer and chat with me, you need to come to
Freak Valley (Netphen Germany) in June, or DesertFest Berlin in April.  

The best praise you received lately?

Kamchatka’s singer told me my work inspired him to create more music, or something like that.
I love his work and his band, so it’s been a real honor. Lonely Kamel asked me to create the cover art for Shit City,
unfortunately I never did so, because of impossible deadlines, and they commissioned it to Vance Kelly,
a great illustrator. It’s one of my worst deceptions to date with Headbang design,
but I’m also proud to know they like my work, and I was proud to get the album title before my friends ah ah. Too bad.

What can we wish you for the future?
Keep on living from my passions, keep on going to cools shows to sell my posters.

Thanks for answering my questions and see you soon on the website !!


Merci!

 

Perixx PERITAB-302

 Perixx PERITAB-302

After the short time required to master the pen and configure shortcuts (for more flexibility and significant time savings), this tablet has everything more expensive ones have but for a much lower price.

Aesthetically very successful, the Perixx PERITAB-302 is extremely thin, ranking easily in a drawer for example, and its graphic area (A4 format) is ideal for any designer or fussy for photo editing. Depending on the software used, the level of pressure on the pen automatically generates black levels more or less supported, or some degrees of inclination of the line.

After many hours of practice, I did not find any obvious defect,. Accurate, complete, ligth and easy to use, here is the alternative awaited by all those who are not ready to spend a fortune on these products. From beginners to experienced artists, the Perixx PERITAB-302 will satisfy the most demanding.


 

Plastic Flame Press (US)

Plastic Flame Press (US)

With bands such as Calexico or Toro y Moi on his 42 pages gigposters.com account, you'll guess that Christopher, the guy behind Plastic Flame press, is a talented and pretty buzy guy. This, already, should be enough to be welcomed on the site, but, thanx to his answers, he helped me discovering many other poster artists I never heard about since now. This is another reason why I really thank him for the time he took answering my questions !

 

Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?
It depends, but it is most likely a podcast. Either: WTF, Tell 'Em Steve Dave, Smodcast, WDW Today or the WDW Radio Show. While printing I usually don't end up listening to music because I start paying way too much attention to it, rather than what I'm working on. If I'm drawing, I'll usually shuffle through stuff in iTunes until something feels right, but I'll hit my mix of Calexico and Pernice Brothers more often than not.


    Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

I'm a 32, almost 33, year old artist, musician, father of one (Seamus Grant). I'm originally from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, but grew up mostly in North Carolina. In addition to gigposters and such, I work as a graphic designer for a weekly paper. and play in a few bands, Maple Stave, Natural Gallerie and Heather Loves Silkworm!.

    When did you start drawing?

 Way, way back. The first thing I can remember drawing was a Transformer. I was sitting at my little table in our house in Florida and wanted one of my parents to get me a Transformer from my room. Rather than just get up and do it, or just describe it, I decided to draw it. Given where this was, I was around 4 or 5. I still have the drawing in a box, and it looks better than the Transformers I occasionally try to draw now. When I decided not to major in Art in college I ended up not really drawing anything, or doing much/any art for a few years. I came back to it my senior year thanks to a friend's senior level class I had stretched my final year to take; it was about graphic novels. Had I not taken that class I could have graduated early, and I probably wouldn't have spent the following decade working on art.

    Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

I did the standard art classes in grade school, and was taking two at a time my senior year. I started out in art when I went to college, but a combination of things (immaturity,  being told that wanting to make 'gigposters' meant that I was 'undecided', etc.) meant that I dropped Art, and got a degree in English. I always wanted to believe I didn't need the fundamentals (I can't count how many times I drew a grayscale between middle school and college), but the fundamentals did help in some ways, for sure. Drawing in notebooks on my own definitely helped me practice, helped me explore creatively more, but the art classes helped me understand how to give things mass and perspective, things I'd have probably not learned if left to my own devices.

    Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

 I do pretty OK off art, but I work my graphic design job to make ends meet. Not ideal, but it keeps me focused.

    Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

 I've done a decent amount of work for publications. Over the last seven years I've contributed a lot to Indy Week, the paper I now work for. I love doing gigposters, but it's fun to step out of that and do something more planned and intricate, and it also gives me more time to learning how to do digital work, something I completely ignored during my school years.

    Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

For a long time, I kept my influences very narrow, but now I look all over and try to absorb things (putting a clear hint in my work from time to time if the influence, I feel, is really obvious). My son's picture books have helped, as have some of my old comic books I've started revisiting now that my son is eager to learn how to read. The poster stuff, I owe a lot to Ron Liberti and Casey Burns for helping me get started. From there, it's the Jay Ryans, Dan Grzecas, Little Friends, Mile 44s, the good, supportive people, that encourage people to make more art, rather than seeing it as a competition. Around here, in the last couple years, the poster thing has been growing, which has been great. Every couple months, some of us end up together, 'you did this? I wish I had done that, how'd you do this?' It's nice to have people at arms' length you can talk shop with. Skillet Gilmore, JT Lucchesi, Dantanamo, Brian Reed, I'm leaving people out, I realize, and I apologize. Outside of gigposters, for art, I cannot get enough Kirby and Darwyn Cooke, and the original camp of Disney Imagineers.

    What are the principal steps in your work ?

The steps, to me, from the outside, are pretty boring. After getting an assignment,I just sort of stumble into an idea. Depending on the time of day, I might sketch it in marker on the bathroom mirror. From there I start drawing it out, full size, usually discard that and start over from scratch. Other than that, it's pretty run of the mill. Separations, burning screens, etc., the boring stuff to make the thing happen.

    Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

For the posters and printwork, I do almost everything by hand. Occasionally, I'll use the computer for separations or a standard font, but probably 98% of my work has been by hand.

    How long does it take you to do a poster?

It depends, most of the time it will take a couple days to come up with something and print it, but, under the gun, I've made a print (conception, to finished run) in about half a day. Other times I've taken weeks to flesh something out. Usually, as the deadline looms closer, the ideas come quicker. This is probably why I don't do more art prints; no deadline.

    You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it ?

I'd be up for it, but considering how bad I am with a) paint, and b) drawing horses, they might have a problem. 

    For which band have you already worked for?

I've done several things for friends' band over the last couple years, bands/people that I've met through a forum online, done a couple posters for the BBQs we end up having, that's probably been some of the most fun.

    For which band would you love to work?

It might be a cop out, but I'm down for just about anyone. There are bands that I used to wish to make posters for, but that's a lot of pressure, and, because of who I am, I'll never be happy with the end result. I did posters for Tortoise and Slint shows several years back, was thrilled to do them, and I can sit down and point out a dozen things I'm still not happy with or that I did entirely wrong.

    Do you choose the artists yourself?

With the venue I do the most work for, Cat's Cradle, I'll sometimes put my name in the hat for certain shows, but it's ultimately up to them. As for other work, 9 times out of 10 I'll make something work out, schedule-wise, regardless of the band.

    What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ?

Making something that the band will be happy with. It certainly doesn't always happen, but it's my main concern; something that is eye-catching, that the band will really like.

    Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

I'd say yes, nationally, internationally, there are people doing the same thing I'm doing, and it's clear that it's a 'thing.' Like I said before, on the local level there is a community of artists. More people: George Hage, Posterhound Family, Kitchen Island, all these people, and that's just within driving distance. Then you take that to Flatstock, you've got 50 artists, then to Renegade and you've a couple more. Gigposters.com isn't just a ragtag group of art misfits, it's evidence of this poster thing being a big deal, or a scene, or whatnot. 

    A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?

Online, through my site, you can see all the stuff, though it is in a storefront thing: plasticflame.com. In person, I've got a lot of stuff at a gallery here in Raleigh, Amplified Art (amplifiedartgallery.com). They've got a pretty extensive collection of gigposters from all over.

    The best praise you received lately?

For the most part, I distance myself from any sort of praise, even in person. I'd rather have someone talk about the show, rather than the poster, because odds are I'll just tell them the poster isn't all that good. Is this healthy behavior, probably not, but it's how I get by.

    What can we wish you for the future?

I'd like to continue making posters. It's the goal I set for myself when I was a kid, seeing old Kozik and Chantry stuff in zines, and it's pretty cool that I grew up to do it. Eventually I know I'll stop for one reason or another, but I'd like to think I have a good number of years left before I'm used up.

Phil Cushway - Art of the Dead (2012)

Phil Cushway - Art of the Dead (2012)

In the world of books dedicated to rock poster art, few of them are completly dedicated to a single band art, most of the time, they deal with an artist and his art. This is truely surprising when you think that those posters are made, firstly, in order to promote a band show. Art of the Dead is an exception. Who else than the Dead can boast about being here from such a long time, who else carried hopes of the youth with so much passion ? Who else produced such powerful shows all along the decades ? Major figure of the US underground scene, they are the soul and inspiration, as this book testify.





The author worked with legends: Griffin, Moscoso, Wilson, Mouse and Kelley, but also with 90s icons: Kozik, Arminski, Forbes or Coop,this shows how serious the guy is. When, in the forewords, he says that the book is, before all, an hommage to the artists and their arts, it is a way to say that the Dead is just an excuse to make this book. A good way to highlight, share and help to make the artists better known with around 140 posters selected. I would also like to highlight the wonderful printing work done on this book, not only by the size of the reproductions but also their quality that allows to see every detail and styles clearly.



Stating that "Griffins, Mouse and Moscoso are not only offsprings of Toulouse Lautrec, Mucha and Chéret, but equally their peers", here is a wonderful book, commented by Greil Marcus, Steven Heller or Mickey Hart, that deinitly demonstrate this statement.



For fans of the Dead, of rock, of posters and, overall art fans !!!


Didier Maiffredy - Rock Poster Art : Sérigraphies de concert (2012)



Didier Maiffredy - Rock Poster Art : Sérigraphies de concert (2012)
 

Books related to Rock Posters Art are really rare in France (as this art is pretty confidential here), but worldwide you can find many books dealing with this subject. Most of the time, they are focusing on a single artist like Brian Ewing, Emek or, let's say R. Black. Very few books cover the whole scene, with the exception of the awesome Art Of Modern Rock: The Poster Explosion, not that easy to carry everywhere with you!


This is the reason why I am so happy to introduce you today to this great french book, hoping that, one day, a courageous american translator will work on it. Didier Maiffredy knows what he is speaking about: collector, art lover, art lecturer, funding president of Les Arts du Rock, you can say he is a keen amateur. Once you will know that Frank Kozik wrote the forewords (both in french and english), you will agree this is a serious work we have here !





More than a collection of reproductions, this book is a true dive into this universe: history (from psychedelism to punk till the contemporary explosion), description of the "scene", the american one of course, but also many other countries, influences and referencies (pop art, art nouveau, recoveries, etc...), presenting many technical aspects (how to silkscreen, economic models, etc...), and true history of art/rock lessons, all of that, of course, filled with numerous posters reproductions (around 150 artists showed here) and, for some of them, the original art they are inspired by.


As cool to look at as well as to read (oh yes there is text here, not only pictures), this is probably one of the most complete book on the subject and, let's face it, it is the work of a frenchy, so, as we say here in France... Cocorico !!! )




Robin Gnista (Sweden)



 Robin Gnista (Sweden)

2013 is no more than 1 month old, and I can already tell you I have a very serious contestant for 2013 artist discovery award ! If you are in a hurry or do not have lot of time to loose by now, please, follow this advice, do not click on this link: www. robingnista.com, keep it for later or, if you are like me, you will spend hours and hours browsing through the pages.  "Hey! I am Robin Gnista. Outta Stockholm, Sweden, I make posters and artwork for bands, clubs or anyone in need of good art. My art is hand drawn, made to very reasonable prices. I mostly do custom orders, so do ask! ". Talent, humility and huge potential, this is all what it is about here !!! Welcome on the blog Robin, and be sure I'll keep an eye(ball) on you ...

 

1 Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are

we listening to when we come to visit you?

Union Carbide Productions, Badfinger, Captain Beefheart, Stooges,
Beatles, etc. Audiobooks are also great when working.

2 Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you

from, what do you do?

I'm an artist from Stockholm, Sweden. I make old fashioned rock and
roll artwork for bands and clubs.


3 When did you start drawing?

In childhood.

4 Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the

margins of your schoolbooks?

 No art education.

5 - Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else

for a living?

Art is my living, takes up most of my time.

6 - Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

Not regularly, but it happens.

7 - Where does your influence come from? Is there any

artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

The chain of 1890s art nouveau; 1960's art nouveau-influenced posters;
and art influenced by these two movements. In general, history, art
and literature that predates 1900 is a great inspiration to me, as
well as 60's psychedelia.

8 - What are the principal steps in your work?

Working with ideas and sketching, making the original piece, scanning
it into a computer where I add color.

9 - Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

Everything by hand except for the colors, which are digitally added.

10 - How long does it take you to do a poster?

No simple answer to that. I've had deadlines of everything between
three days and three months. But the work includes coming up with
ideas that works in several required aspects, making sketches, making
the original art, changing your mind, making mistakes such as spilling
coffee or sneezing at a crucial moment, redoing stuff, communication
with the customer, it all depends so much.

11 - You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you

feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses

running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are

you up for it?

Thanks! Well, generally I'm asked to do what I do best, with a lot of
artistic freedom, which I appreciate a lot. I accept unusual requests
in case I see potential of a good result in them.

12 - For which band have you already worked for?

Lots. I'm happy to have worked with Horisont, on their Second Assault
LP cover. Another band is Dean Allen Foyd, with whom I have a ongoing
cooperation. I consider them the best psychedelic band of today. For
two years or more, I've been working with the rock club Püssy A Go Go
in Stockholm, I've done nearly all their artwork, which has resulted
in probably 60 posters, logos etc.

13 - For which band would you love to work?

Roky Erickson.

14 - Do you choose the artists yourself?

The bands and clubs contact me.

15 - What is the most difficult part in designing a poster?

Working by hand in a tight timeframe, you have to get it right
directly - so if you make a mistake or a section of tour dates are
changed, you're in trouble.

16 - Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else?

No, most design guys around here have a modernistic approach to art,
which I don't.

17 - A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where

can we see your work, on the web or in real life?

Some of my works are to be seen as wallpaintings at the rock club
Püssy A Go Go in Stockholm.

18 - The best praise you received lately?


Unknowing of who I was, two guys standing next to me at a record store
started talking about this "awesome poster artist Robin Gnista".
Praise is a weird thing to handle, but if you hear it like that, it
feels like a true compliment.

19 - What can we wish you for the future?

Health and more international jobs, and I'll be fine.


20 - Thanks for answering my questions and see you soon on the website !!

It's really beautiful seeing you support poster art with your blog, thank you!