Plastic Flame Press (US)

Plastic Flame Press (US)

With bands such as Calexico or Toro y Moi on his 42 pages gigposters.com account, you'll guess that Christopher, the guy behind Plastic Flame press, is a talented and pretty buzy guy. This, already, should be enough to be welcomed on the site, but, thanx to his answers, he helped me discovering many other poster artists I never heard about since now. This is another reason why I really thank him for the time he took answering my questions !

 

Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?
It depends, but it is most likely a podcast. Either: WTF, Tell 'Em Steve Dave, Smodcast, WDW Today or the WDW Radio Show. While printing I usually don't end up listening to music because I start paying way too much attention to it, rather than what I'm working on. If I'm drawing, I'll usually shuffle through stuff in iTunes until something feels right, but I'll hit my mix of Calexico and Pernice Brothers more often than not.


    Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

I'm a 32, almost 33, year old artist, musician, father of one (Seamus Grant). I'm originally from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, but grew up mostly in North Carolina. In addition to gigposters and such, I work as a graphic designer for a weekly paper. and play in a few bands, Maple Stave, Natural Gallerie and Heather Loves Silkworm!.

    When did you start drawing?

 Way, way back. The first thing I can remember drawing was a Transformer. I was sitting at my little table in our house in Florida and wanted one of my parents to get me a Transformer from my room. Rather than just get up and do it, or just describe it, I decided to draw it. Given where this was, I was around 4 or 5. I still have the drawing in a box, and it looks better than the Transformers I occasionally try to draw now. When I decided not to major in Art in college I ended up not really drawing anything, or doing much/any art for a few years. I came back to it my senior year thanks to a friend's senior level class I had stretched my final year to take; it was about graphic novels. Had I not taken that class I could have graduated early, and I probably wouldn't have spent the following decade working on art.

    Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

I did the standard art classes in grade school, and was taking two at a time my senior year. I started out in art when I went to college, but a combination of things (immaturity,  being told that wanting to make 'gigposters' meant that I was 'undecided', etc.) meant that I dropped Art, and got a degree in English. I always wanted to believe I didn't need the fundamentals (I can't count how many times I drew a grayscale between middle school and college), but the fundamentals did help in some ways, for sure. Drawing in notebooks on my own definitely helped me practice, helped me explore creatively more, but the art classes helped me understand how to give things mass and perspective, things I'd have probably not learned if left to my own devices.

    Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

 I do pretty OK off art, but I work my graphic design job to make ends meet. Not ideal, but it keeps me focused.

    Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

 I've done a decent amount of work for publications. Over the last seven years I've contributed a lot to Indy Week, the paper I now work for. I love doing gigposters, but it's fun to step out of that and do something more planned and intricate, and it also gives me more time to learning how to do digital work, something I completely ignored during my school years.

    Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

For a long time, I kept my influences very narrow, but now I look all over and try to absorb things (putting a clear hint in my work from time to time if the influence, I feel, is really obvious). My son's picture books have helped, as have some of my old comic books I've started revisiting now that my son is eager to learn how to read. The poster stuff, I owe a lot to Ron Liberti and Casey Burns for helping me get started. From there, it's the Jay Ryans, Dan Grzecas, Little Friends, Mile 44s, the good, supportive people, that encourage people to make more art, rather than seeing it as a competition. Around here, in the last couple years, the poster thing has been growing, which has been great. Every couple months, some of us end up together, 'you did this? I wish I had done that, how'd you do this?' It's nice to have people at arms' length you can talk shop with. Skillet Gilmore, JT Lucchesi, Dantanamo, Brian Reed, I'm leaving people out, I realize, and I apologize. Outside of gigposters, for art, I cannot get enough Kirby and Darwyn Cooke, and the original camp of Disney Imagineers.

    What are the principal steps in your work ?

The steps, to me, from the outside, are pretty boring. After getting an assignment,I just sort of stumble into an idea. Depending on the time of day, I might sketch it in marker on the bathroom mirror. From there I start drawing it out, full size, usually discard that and start over from scratch. Other than that, it's pretty run of the mill. Separations, burning screens, etc., the boring stuff to make the thing happen.

    Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

For the posters and printwork, I do almost everything by hand. Occasionally, I'll use the computer for separations or a standard font, but probably 98% of my work has been by hand.

    How long does it take you to do a poster?

It depends, most of the time it will take a couple days to come up with something and print it, but, under the gun, I've made a print (conception, to finished run) in about half a day. Other times I've taken weeks to flesh something out. Usually, as the deadline looms closer, the ideas come quicker. This is probably why I don't do more art prints; no deadline.

    You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it ?

I'd be up for it, but considering how bad I am with a) paint, and b) drawing horses, they might have a problem. 

    For which band have you already worked for?

I've done several things for friends' band over the last couple years, bands/people that I've met through a forum online, done a couple posters for the BBQs we end up having, that's probably been some of the most fun.

    For which band would you love to work?

It might be a cop out, but I'm down for just about anyone. There are bands that I used to wish to make posters for, but that's a lot of pressure, and, because of who I am, I'll never be happy with the end result. I did posters for Tortoise and Slint shows several years back, was thrilled to do them, and I can sit down and point out a dozen things I'm still not happy with or that I did entirely wrong.

    Do you choose the artists yourself?

With the venue I do the most work for, Cat's Cradle, I'll sometimes put my name in the hat for certain shows, but it's ultimately up to them. As for other work, 9 times out of 10 I'll make something work out, schedule-wise, regardless of the band.

    What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ?

Making something that the band will be happy with. It certainly doesn't always happen, but it's my main concern; something that is eye-catching, that the band will really like.

    Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

I'd say yes, nationally, internationally, there are people doing the same thing I'm doing, and it's clear that it's a 'thing.' Like I said before, on the local level there is a community of artists. More people: George Hage, Posterhound Family, Kitchen Island, all these people, and that's just within driving distance. Then you take that to Flatstock, you've got 50 artists, then to Renegade and you've a couple more. Gigposters.com isn't just a ragtag group of art misfits, it's evidence of this poster thing being a big deal, or a scene, or whatnot. 

    A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?

Online, through my site, you can see all the stuff, though it is in a storefront thing: plasticflame.com. In person, I've got a lot of stuff at a gallery here in Raleigh, Amplified Art (amplifiedartgallery.com). They've got a pretty extensive collection of gigposters from all over.

    The best praise you received lately?

For the most part, I distance myself from any sort of praise, even in person. I'd rather have someone talk about the show, rather than the poster, because odds are I'll just tell them the poster isn't all that good. Is this healthy behavior, probably not, but it's how I get by.

    What can we wish you for the future?

I'd like to continue making posters. It's the goal I set for myself when I was a kid, seeing old Kozik and Chantry stuff in zines, and it's pretty cool that I grew up to do it. Eventually I know I'll stop for one reason or another, but I'd like to think I have a good number of years left before I'm used up.

Phil Cushway - Art of the Dead (2012)

Phil Cushway - Art of the Dead (2012)

In the world of books dedicated to rock poster art, few of them are completly dedicated to a single band art, most of the time, they deal with an artist and his art. This is truely surprising when you think that those posters are made, firstly, in order to promote a band show. Art of the Dead is an exception. Who else than the Dead can boast about being here from such a long time, who else carried hopes of the youth with so much passion ? Who else produced such powerful shows all along the decades ? Major figure of the US underground scene, they are the soul and inspiration, as this book testify.





The author worked with legends: Griffin, Moscoso, Wilson, Mouse and Kelley, but also with 90s icons: Kozik, Arminski, Forbes or Coop,this shows how serious the guy is. When, in the forewords, he says that the book is, before all, an hommage to the artists and their arts, it is a way to say that the Dead is just an excuse to make this book. A good way to highlight, share and help to make the artists better known with around 140 posters selected. I would also like to highlight the wonderful printing work done on this book, not only by the size of the reproductions but also their quality that allows to see every detail and styles clearly.



Stating that "Griffins, Mouse and Moscoso are not only offsprings of Toulouse Lautrec, Mucha and Chéret, but equally their peers", here is a wonderful book, commented by Greil Marcus, Steven Heller or Mickey Hart, that deinitly demonstrate this statement.



For fans of the Dead, of rock, of posters and, overall art fans !!!


Didier Maiffredy - Rock Poster Art : Sérigraphies de concert (2012)



Didier Maiffredy - Rock Poster Art : Sérigraphies de concert (2012)
 

Books related to Rock Posters Art are really rare in France (as this art is pretty confidential here), but worldwide you can find many books dealing with this subject. Most of the time, they are focusing on a single artist like Brian Ewing, Emek or, let's say R. Black. Very few books cover the whole scene, with the exception of the awesome Art Of Modern Rock: The Poster Explosion, not that easy to carry everywhere with you!


This is the reason why I am so happy to introduce you today to this great french book, hoping that, one day, a courageous american translator will work on it. Didier Maiffredy knows what he is speaking about: collector, art lover, art lecturer, funding president of Les Arts du Rock, you can say he is a keen amateur. Once you will know that Frank Kozik wrote the forewords (both in french and english), you will agree this is a serious work we have here !





More than a collection of reproductions, this book is a true dive into this universe: history (from psychedelism to punk till the contemporary explosion), description of the "scene", the american one of course, but also many other countries, influences and referencies (pop art, art nouveau, recoveries, etc...), presenting many technical aspects (how to silkscreen, economic models, etc...), and true history of art/rock lessons, all of that, of course, filled with numerous posters reproductions (around 150 artists showed here) and, for some of them, the original art they are inspired by.


As cool to look at as well as to read (oh yes there is text here, not only pictures), this is probably one of the most complete book on the subject and, let's face it, it is the work of a frenchy, so, as we say here in France... Cocorico !!! )




Robin Gnista (Sweden)



 Robin Gnista (Sweden)

2013 is no more than 1 month old, and I can already tell you I have a very serious contestant for 2013 artist discovery award ! If you are in a hurry or do not have lot of time to loose by now, please, follow this advice, do not click on this link: www. robingnista.com, keep it for later or, if you are like me, you will spend hours and hours browsing through the pages.  "Hey! I am Robin Gnista. Outta Stockholm, Sweden, I make posters and artwork for bands, clubs or anyone in need of good art. My art is hand drawn, made to very reasonable prices. I mostly do custom orders, so do ask! ". Talent, humility and huge potential, this is all what it is about here !!! Welcome on the blog Robin, and be sure I'll keep an eye(ball) on you ...

 

1 Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are

we listening to when we come to visit you?

Union Carbide Productions, Badfinger, Captain Beefheart, Stooges,
Beatles, etc. Audiobooks are also great when working.

2 Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you

from, what do you do?

I'm an artist from Stockholm, Sweden. I make old fashioned rock and
roll artwork for bands and clubs.


3 When did you start drawing?

In childhood.

4 Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the

margins of your schoolbooks?

 No art education.

5 - Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else

for a living?

Art is my living, takes up most of my time.

6 - Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

Not regularly, but it happens.

7 - Where does your influence come from? Is there any

artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

The chain of 1890s art nouveau; 1960's art nouveau-influenced posters;
and art influenced by these two movements. In general, history, art
and literature that predates 1900 is a great inspiration to me, as
well as 60's psychedelia.

8 - What are the principal steps in your work?

Working with ideas and sketching, making the original piece, scanning
it into a computer where I add color.

9 - Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

Everything by hand except for the colors, which are digitally added.

10 - How long does it take you to do a poster?

No simple answer to that. I've had deadlines of everything between
three days and three months. But the work includes coming up with
ideas that works in several required aspects, making sketches, making
the original art, changing your mind, making mistakes such as spilling
coffee or sneezing at a crucial moment, redoing stuff, communication
with the customer, it all depends so much.

11 - You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you

feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses

running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are

you up for it?

Thanks! Well, generally I'm asked to do what I do best, with a lot of
artistic freedom, which I appreciate a lot. I accept unusual requests
in case I see potential of a good result in them.

12 - For which band have you already worked for?

Lots. I'm happy to have worked with Horisont, on their Second Assault
LP cover. Another band is Dean Allen Foyd, with whom I have a ongoing
cooperation. I consider them the best psychedelic band of today. For
two years or more, I've been working with the rock club Püssy A Go Go
in Stockholm, I've done nearly all their artwork, which has resulted
in probably 60 posters, logos etc.

13 - For which band would you love to work?

Roky Erickson.

14 - Do you choose the artists yourself?

The bands and clubs contact me.

15 - What is the most difficult part in designing a poster?

Working by hand in a tight timeframe, you have to get it right
directly - so if you make a mistake or a section of tour dates are
changed, you're in trouble.

16 - Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else?

No, most design guys around here have a modernistic approach to art,
which I don't.

17 - A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where

can we see your work, on the web or in real life?

Some of my works are to be seen as wallpaintings at the rock club
Püssy A Go Go in Stockholm.

18 - The best praise you received lately?


Unknowing of who I was, two guys standing next to me at a record store
started talking about this "awesome poster artist Robin Gnista".
Praise is a weird thing to handle, but if you hear it like that, it
feels like a true compliment.

19 - What can we wish you for the future?

Health and more international jobs, and I'll be fine.


20 - Thanks for answering my questions and see you soon on the website !!

It's really beautiful seeing you support poster art with your blog, thank you!

Jeff LaChance (US)


Jeff LaChance (US)

The good thing with Jeff LaChance is that, when you try to learn more about him by, let's say, looking at his FB profile, you discover that he is "extremely shallow, uninteresting and short sighted". This said, you still can have a look at his work, far from being uninteresting ;), and even, take time to read the interview. Believe me, a guy who worked for AC/DC, Motley Crue and many other great names (incl. the Melvins) can't be totally short sighed :D Many thanx Jeff for your answers and your time !



Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?

Over the past couple of days I've been all over the place. I've been listening to Foxy Shazam, Rush, Tester (local rock / metal band) Currently playing is "Life, Sex and Death - The Silent Majority"

Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

My name is Jeff LaChance, from Boston, Massachusetts and I'm a freelance illustrator / designer.

When did you start drawing?

I've been drawing, doodling since my memory came online sometime in the early 70's.

Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

I did take "graphic communications" in high school but found it mundane...crumbling up a piece of paper and then drawing it bored me to tears. Being a fan of Ed "Big Daddy" Roth and Jim Phillips, I wanted to draw monsters, ghouls, and creeps. Looking back now of course, I certainly wished I'd taken the time and opportunity to learn things back then. I probably would've saved myself a lot of time and headaches "learning on the job".


Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

I do make my living doing art, and my main focus is illustration and tee shirt design.

Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

I'm not working on a continuing basis with any one magazine, but I have done work for Revovler Magazine as well as Royal Flush Magazine. I've been published in several "rock art" books as well. Such as "The Art of Modern Rock", Pandameat - a Frank Kozik project, AC?DC: High Voltage Rock 'n' Roll: The Ultimate Illustrated History and "Gigposters - Volume One".

Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

Ed "Big Daddy" Roth and the 80's skateboard art of Jim Phillips had a HUGE influence on me as a kid...always had a fascination with the monsters and creeps that were so prevalent in their work. I love TONS of artists...people like Frank Kozik and Jermaine Rogers' whose work in the 90's was very important to me, not in a style sense, but certainly in an influential sense...the catalyst to get me interested in doing gig posters.


What are the principal steps in your work ?

Concept is easily the most difficult step for me. If possible, visually, I look for something that suits the bands music or "vibe"...sometimes more successfully than others. I try not to use the opportunity just as a vehicle for "my work", in other words, I don't just slap some illustration I've done on a poster, add text and send it off. I try and put some thought into it...for each band. I consider it a privledge to be asked to do a poster...and I want to take that opportunity seriously.

Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

I use both. I usually do the illustration by hand, and use the computer for color and type. Although, I have done type by hand and I have done illustration digitally. Is that confusing enough?

I'm gonna go with my first answer. I use both.


How long does it take you to do a poster?

Usually a couple days...sometimes longer. Depending on how much detail I go into on the illustration. That is always the most time consuming part of any of my posters.

You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it?

Hahaha, if someone asks me for an oil painting of a horse, they haven't seen my work. Although I experiment with different mediums in my free time, I stick to what I know best and the skill I've spent the most time honing, which is pen and ink. I'm always working to improve my art and my skills...and once I get to oil painting horses, I will add that to my list of services.

For which band have you already worked for?

Too many to list, but a few of the more popular bands I've done work for include Faith No More, Peeping Tom, KISS, Motley Crue, AC/DC, Fishbone, The Darkness, Melvins, Primus, Big Business, High on Fire, Buckethead, Queens of the Stone Age and The Sword.

For which band would you love to work?

Foo Fighters, Foo Fighters, Foo Fighters, Foo Fighters,...being a drummer as well as a working artist, I am an unapologetic uber fan of anything Dave Grohl.

also Cheap Trick, Foxy Shazam, Rush...I'm sure there are many more...but those are off the top of my head.


Do you choose the artists yourself?

I am usually contacted by the venue or promoter, things have changed a great deal from when I began doing gig posters. Things are far more structured now, with alot of bands going through promoters or sticking with designers or design houses that have done work for them in the past.

What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ?

Concept, concept concept.

.....usually.

Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

I don't think I'm part of the "current" graphic scene at all...and that's not necessarily a "bad thing". I think there are trappings with being associated with a scene or a movement. Restrictions or expectations, real or imagined...by others or yourself. Almost similar to when a musician is successful with a certain sound or song...the record company or fan base expect the same thing because THAT is what made them popular....

So I'm OK with just doing what I want...and letting other people figure out what scene I belong to or what category I belong in.

A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?



The best praise you received lately?

Any time someone buys a poster, or an art print or inquires about having me do work for them, I consider that "praise"...to have people interested in what I draw was always a dream for me when I was young...so it's kind of cool.

What can we wish you for the future?

I'm a bit simplistic in my expectations and goals. As long as I can eek out a living doing what I love, I'll be happy. So you can wish for me to continue to find work and people interested in me doing work for them. If I were to get lofty with my goals, I'd love to get into toy design, as well as have my artwork appear on more magazines, skateboards and snowboards.

Chris Hitchman (UK)




Chris Hitchman (UK)

I discovered Chris' work thanx to Monster Magnet. His stunning poster for the Spine of God tour was just so perfect I couldn't afford not to have him on the blog. So welcome Mr Hitchman and, of course, a very happy new year !!!




Hello, of course as every Crewk interview, first question: what are we listening to when we come to visit you?

Right now silence, but usually my music taste is all over the place and changes constantly, depending on mood and what I'm working on. Melvins, Múm, Brian Jonestown, Dead Meadow, Tom Waits, 13th Floor Elevators, Blonde Redhead, Mazzy Star, Swans, Comets on Fire, Black Angels...  to name a few on the playlist recently, along with some weird noise rock and a load of obscure garage bands.

Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

My name is Chris Hitchman. I'm from South Wales. Aged 27. I like art and music and attempting to combine the two. I wish I had more posters to show, I'm actually working on three right now so I'll keep you updated!

When did you start drawing?

As soon as I could hold something to draw with. I think most kids draw and create in their own way, I was just slightly more obsessive about it.

Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your school books?

Art was my favourite subject in school and I'd quite often get told off for drawing in the backs of my books in other classes. I studied A level art but I didn't really have any direction after that, started a few courses, decided they weren't for me. Worked a few jobs, hated them. It wasn't until a few years later that I decided that this was what I really wanted to do and it's mostly been self-taught, do it yourself, find out what you can ever since there. I think only now, many years later am I finally starting to find a style that I'm comfortable and happy with.

Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living?

Not sure if I'm making a living but getting by, although some awesome projects have just started coming my way so I'm hoping this year will be a good one!

Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?


No. But I'd like to.

Where does your influence come from? Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?


Life, and pretty much everything around me really. I feel like I follow so many artists, painters, illustrators and poster designers and keep finding new ones each day that If I mentioned just a few I'd feel rude for missing out others!

What are the principal steps in your work?

Think about it for way too long. Then panic that I have no time left. Think again. Sketch ideas. Rip them up and move them around on a lightbox until I'm happy with the placement. Same process with the fonts. My sketches are usually super rough and messy so I'll re trace the whole thing so it's clean and tidy, and then on to the inking. Finally scan it in and add colour if needed.

Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

Mostly by hand with a few exceptions.

How long does it take you to do a poster?

Anything from a day to a week.

You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it?

I'd like to think if a band came to me they'd have a vague idea of what they were going to expect from me. I wouldn't be comfortable accepting a job in oils as I don't think I'd be doing my best work and that wouldn't be fair, but I'm always up for getting creative and experimenting with different ideas and concepts. I've had some pretty weird ones already so definitely not a problem.

For which band have you already worked for?

Mostly local bands so far. I've been lucky to live in an area with a pretty awesome music scene that I enjoy and that has definitely helped me to get inspired, create album art, tees and posters. My first big job was creating a poster for Monster Magnets 20th anniversary tour of their Spine Of God album and I've recently been asked to design a poster for Mudhoney which I'm way too excited about!

For which band would you love to work?

Melvins!! Seriously though, any band that I enjoy listening to, whether I've heard of you before or not. I think the list would be endless! I think Tom Waits would be a fun challenge, not quite sure he'd dig my stuff though!

Do you choose the artists yourself?

I'm just starting out so I've mostly contacted bands I feel my style may suit, although others have started coming to me recently which is definitely exciting!

What is the most difficult part in designing a poster?

The initial concept and anything that involves using a computer.

Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else?

I'm not too sure how to answer this one. There are other artists that I talk to, who inspire me and are helpful and supportive to each other, but I don't think I belong to a 'scene'. I do what I enjoy and think doing your own thing as an artist is the most important. Saying that though, there's a few artists from South Wales I admire, maybe that's my scene, artist such as Jimbob Issac, Oram, Godmachine and some awesome new talent from artists such as Gareth John Day at the Hand of Doom and Sarah Esprit.

A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?

You can find my posters and other artwork at my blog, shop or facebook.

http://chrishitchmanart.blogspot.co.uk/
http://chrishitchmanart.bigcartel.com/

The best praise you received lately?

Most recently 'I like your style', because to me finding your own style is the hardest part. I'm sure I'm still not there yet but that means a lot to me.

What can we wish you for the future?

To get my art out there... More posters. More album covers. More awesome music!

Thanks for answering my questions and see you soon on the website!!

Thank you for finding me!

Brookesia Studio (SP)

Brookesia Studio (SP)

First thing first, a very happy new year to you all dear readers. I have been quite busy but here we go again for a new year of interviews, beautiful prints and many surprises to come soon !! So, in order to begin the year with a little bit of sun, please welcome Brookesia Studio on the blog and Feliz ano nuevo to them ! :)





What are we listening to when we come to visit you?

At the moment we are listening to the new Hellshock 12” - Shadows of the afterworld


Can you tell us more about yourself, who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

Brookesia studio are us – Mariñe and Rubén, two lovers of music, graphic design and art  in general. We come together beginning 2012 in Bilbao to create this project for on the one hand graphic design of posters, album covers, flyers, etc.  and on the other hand in order to make as much as possible projects in screen printing, which is our other big love. Let it be posters, covers, shirts, whatever...

When did you start drawing?

From childhood on we started painting the walls of our parents homes... and until today we did not stop to create...

 
Did you follow any course or did you improve by drawing in the margins of your schoolbooks?

Me, Mariñe, got licensed in Arts, but somehow both are autodidacts in some way, we were developping our own resources with influences of other artists from near as well as from artists of the other side of the world. Above all, we never stopped and are constituting step by step our own style, but in arts we think you never stop learning, experience and discover yourself.



Today are you living from your art, or do you do something else for a living ?

Actually, we are starting and have more depth than benefits.... but we are conscious about starts in the world of arts are generally quite hard... but we are up to fight and give everything to be able to live from what we like to do most.



Are you collaborating with magazines/fanzines, regularly?

In our short career we have ocasionally participated in some fanzine, magazins... sporadically.



Where does your influence come from?

Is there any artists/graphists you particularly like, what are your influences?

Ugh, we could not say precisely one... we love arts in general, and always have been infuenced by different artists, painters, illustrators, sculptors... from whatever epoch.... just to mention some: classic victorian age, engraving, movements of the beginning and middle of the century (futurism, dadaism, surrealism), steampunk and above all modern illustration, all these tendencies have left their marks.




What are the principal steps in your work ?

Eg, when we have an assignment, we join and bring together all our ideas and having in mind different points of view we decide... However, we think it very important that our works is getting along with the style of the band. Therefore, the first thing is to know the essence and esthetics of each band, afterwards we start working on each design and printing.



Do you do everything by hand or on computer?

For us, both tools are equally necessary.


How long does it take you to do a poster?

Well, it depends on many things, the complexity of the design and of our state of mind, hahaha



You have a very distinctive style, are you doing only what you feel like or if tomorrow somebody asks you an oil painting with horses running out of water with a sunset backdrop, is it a problem or are you up for it ?

To be true it is always better and more satisfying to create how it comes from you inside and to hold on to your style and esthetics you like and which are motivating you... but we are open-minded to whatever people might ask for, but obviously within our ethics.


 



For which band have you already worked for?

We have worked for many bands which came touring here from Europe and other parts of the world. Eg. Baroness, Neila, Destierro, Antisect, Poisson Idea, Future Ruins, etc...


For which band would you love to work?

Hhmm, many bands, especially wolves in the throne rooms, amebix, neurosis....


Do you choose the artists yourself?

No, or sometimes yes, depends on the circumstancies, normally we work on orders.


What is the most difficult part in designing a poster ?

To have a clear idea and to realize it, say to picture what you have in mind in a piece of paper, as well as developping the structure and composition of the design once you got that, everything goes on...



Do you think you are part of a "Graphic Scene", if so who else ?

We are part of this collective of music posters in Spain: (http://www.thepostercollective.org/)


A bit of self-promotion, take advantage of it, it's free, where can we see your work , on the web or in real life?

We have a Brookesia Studio facebook account and a webpage is under construction.


The best praise you received lately?

The best compensation is that people value and appreciate your work.

What can we wish you for the future?

Go on with Brookesia Studio and continue learning.